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You are here: Home Courses Middlebury-CMRS Course List HIST 0940 Revolutions and the Making of Modern Britain - only offered Autumn 2017

HIST 0940 Revolutions and the Making of Modern Britain - only offered Autumn 2017

[Please note: This seminar is offered for the Autumn 2017 semester. It is not offered in Spring 2018. Each seminar runs only if there is sufficient student demand.] The "Glorious" Revolution of 1688 expelled the Catholic line of the Stuarts from Britain, but it has also been seen as opening up a new era in political, social and economic history. Religious toleration, the development of Parliamentary government, the Union with Scotland, commercial expansion and the spread of empire have all been traced to what one historian calls "the first modern revolution." How "modern" was 1688? Who were the winners and losers? How did it shape the first industrial nation and the biggest empire ever seen in history?

This course is taught by Professor Paul Monod, who is Principal of Middlebury-CMRS, and Fellow by Special Election at Keble College.  He is the author of several books on British history in this period, including Imperial Island: A History of Britain and Its Empire (Wiley-Blackwell, 2008), The Murder of Mr. Grebell: Madness and Civility in an English Town (Yale U.P., 2003), and Jacobitism and the English People, 1688-1788 (Cambridge U.P., 1989).

Sample readings:

Linda Colley, Britons: Forging the Nation, 1707­-1837 (1994, second edition 2006)

Steven Pincus, 1688: The First Modern Revolution (2009)

J.C.D. Clark, English Society, 1660-1832 (second edition 2000)

Allan I. MacInnes, Union and Empire: the Making of the United Kingdom in 1707 (2007)

Eamonn O Ciardha, Ireland and the Jacobite Cause, 1685-1766: A Fatal Attachment (2004)

Tim Harris, Revolution: The Great Crisis of the British Monarchy (2006)

Scott Sowerby, Making Toleration: The Repealers and the Glorious Revolution (2013)

Mark Knights, Representation and Misrepresentation in Later Stuart Britain (2005)

Owen Stanwood, The Empire Reformed; English America in the Age of the Glorious Revolution (2011)

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